European History Articles by Amanda Jones — Knoji
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Amanda Jones has written 6 European History articles, has received +27 recommendations and is currently the #2 ranked expert in this subject.
Here are Amanda Jones's articles in European History:
Caesar‘s march on Rome is also referred to as Caesars civil war. There is no doubt he unleashed a civil war, but there is also no doubt that he was the ablest general and a great soldier. He was a man of decision and his crossing the Rubicon River was an act of great decisive importance. He would not have crossed the Rubicon, in case he was not consumed by a burning ambition to control the destiny of Rome.
Published by Madan G Singh 56 months ago in European History | +2 votes | 1 comments
Facts about the last of King Henry VIII's six wives, Catherine Parr.
Published by Amanda Jones 91 months ago in European History | +5 votes | 1 comments
Facts about Catherine Howard, King Henry VIII's fifth wife.
Published by Amanda Jones 91 months ago in European History | +4 votes | 1 comments
Facts about King Henry VIII's fourth wife, Anne of Cleves
Published by Amanda Jones 91 months ago in European History | +2 votes | 0 comments
Facts about King Henry VIII's second wife, Anne Boleyn
Published by Amanda Jones 91 months ago in European History | +7 votes | 6 comments
The crucial facts about Catherine of Aragon, first wife of King Henry VIII of England
Published by Amanda Jones 91 months ago in European History | +5 votes | 2 comments
Perhaps the earliest reference to ancient Saracen to appear in history was that of the Sarakenoi people, whom lived in the north-western Arabian peninsula. The Sarakenoi people were very distinct from the Arabs, however, over time the term became so applicable to Arab people it even became synonymous the word Muslim.
Published by Mark 93 months ago in European History | +5 votes | 2 comments
Growing Up in Ancient Greece. Being a Child in Ancient Greece.
Published by Amanda Wilkins 93 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 0 comments
Manor houses of the Renaissance period belong to a special class of architecture characteristic of the age. A manor house is a fortified country house.
Published by mdlawyer 95 months ago in European History | +7 votes | 2 comments
The Tower of London and Windsor Castle are two of the most famous castles in Britain.
Published by Souvik Chanda 95 months ago in European History | +3 votes | 0 comments
A vivdd picture of Holocaust survivors, their triumphs, tribulations, and how it can be applied to today's issues.
Published by Julie Frey 95 months ago in European History | +4 votes | 2 comments
At first glance, Carcassonne ignites visions of Camelot with conical roofs and medieval soldiers returning from battle. If only the legend matched the history. Carcassonne in Languedoc is situated in the picturesque region of southwest France, standing upon ancient trade routes between the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 96 months ago in European History | +20 votes | 15 comments
“Marching Season” has come again to the communities of Northern Ireland, a time when various groups march and hold rallies to commemorate long-ago Protestant victories over the Catholic monarchy of James II in this mixed-rule enclave of the United Kingdom. But what, exactly, are the marchers commemorating, and how is it still relevant, over 300 years later?
Published by Mark Spence 96 months ago in European History | +6 votes | 7 comments
Cachtice Castle is situated in the illustrious Carpathian Mountains in Slovakia. Originally it was constructed as a guard post on the thoroughfare to Moravia. Cachtice Castle gained prominence when it became the home of Elizabeth Bathory, otherwise known as the “Blood Countess” or the “Bloody Lady of Cachtice”.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 96 months ago in European History | +15 votes | 14 comments
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