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At first glance, Carcassonne ignites visions of Camelot with conical roofs and medieval soldiers returning from battle. If only the legend matched the history. Carcassonne in Languedoc is situated in the picturesque region of southwest France, standing upon ancient trade routes between the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 90 months ago in European History | +20 votes | 15 comments
Cachtice Castle is situated in the illustrious Carpathian Mountains in Slovakia. Originally it was constructed as a guard post on the thoroughfare to Moravia. Cachtice Castle gained prominence when it became the home of Elizabeth Bathory, otherwise known as the “Blood Countess” or the “Bloody Lady of Cachtice”.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 90 months ago in European History | +15 votes | 14 comments
Emma Hamilton became the talk of England when she became the mistress of Lord Horatio Nelson, one of England's most famous heroes. Nelson was honoured when he died for king and country at the Battle of Trafalgar, Emma was ignored and died in poverty.
Published by Marion Caragounis 80 months ago in European History | +12 votes | 10 comments
A concise history of the lead pencil how it evolved from lead to graphite. It's secret use in WW2 and it's links with the Bond movies.
Published by Marion Caragounis 75 months ago in European History | +10 votes | 9 comments
A break down of the Countries and land areas that comprise the United Kingdom.
Published by Audra Jones 79 months ago in European History | +4 votes | 9 comments
What happened after the Titanic sunk? How is ocean travel safer now because of the sinking of the Titanic
Published by Rae Morvay 80 months ago in European History | +9 votes | 8 comments
John Stuart Mill is regarded as a pioneer feminist. His essay 'the subjection of women' speeded the parliament amendment which gave equal rights to women in many spheres.
Published by Sai Deepa 74 months ago in European History | +6 votes | 7 comments
“Marching Season” has come again to the communities of Northern Ireland, a time when various groups march and hold rallies to commemorate long-ago Protestant victories over the Catholic monarchy of James II in this mixed-rule enclave of the United Kingdom. But what, exactly, are the marchers commemorating, and how is it still relevant, over 300 years later?
Published by Mark Spence 90 months ago in European History | +6 votes | 7 comments
Facts about King Henry VIII's second wife, Anne Boleyn
Published by Amanda Jones 85 months ago in European History | +7 votes | 6 comments
The site of the Battle of Hastings makes a great day out for all the family. Learn about the Normans and the Saxons at the Centre and walk around the battlefield.
Published by Marion Caragounis 82 months ago in European History | +8 votes | 5 comments
How did England,Scotland,Wales and Ireland decide upon their chosen Patron Saint? Read the story of St. George,St. Andrew, St.David and St. Patrick and you will know.
Published by Marion Caragounis 81 months ago in European History | +3 votes | 4 comments
Dachau Concentration Camp was used for more than Jewish internment but was an integral part of WWII History.
Published by Kathryn Perez 79 months ago in European History | +2 votes | 3 comments
The history of the sinking of the Titanic. What happened the night the Titanic sank.
Published by Rae Morvay 81 months ago in European History | +6 votes | 3 comments
Summer tourists visiting Greece for sea,sun and pleasure would enrich their holiday by stopping off at Athens to see the Partheon. One of the most famous ancient monuments in the world, the temple of Athena on the rocky face of the Acropolis is a sight not to be missed.
Published by Marion Caragounis 83 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 3 comments
Ever since tea became an internationally loved drink, people have argued over how to make it ‘just so’. China tea and Indian tea are very different in their appeal. No-one would add milk or sugar to China tea, but Indian tea suffers from both. What gives us the perfect western cuppa?
Published by Leslie Kendall 69 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 2 comments
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