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Obviously although intended to be humane the guillotine was far from it. Not that any one in our day in age would think it was humane but back in the 1700's it was a more precise way of doing things and was supposed to cause instant death. Here is why the Guilltine turned out to not be such a humane way of putting a human being charged of a creme to death. Warning not for the faint of heart.
Published by Rae Morvay 52 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 0 comments
Frederick II (1194 – 1250) is considered one of the most powerful Holy Roman emperors during the Middle Ages. He was a resolute man and was not averse to opposing his own son in case his authority was in anyway way impinged. He was always at loggerheads with the popes and that was the cause of the collapse of his dynasty after his death.
Published by Madan G Singh 54 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 0 comments
In the horrible times of World War II, there were few bright spots. One of the greatest stories was a German Oskar Schindler whose efforts save the lives of thousands of Jews. He risked his life and spent all the money he had earned to protect the Jewish people. He understood that Jewish people were just like any other human being.
Published by Jacob Carvalho 230 months ago in European History | +0 votes | 0 comments
During the Franco -German war of 1870 supplies to the city were cut and the butchers started serving horse meat by killing the available horses. But with the blockade the horses as a source of supply of meat dwindled and Parisians had to turn to other animals. The only immediate source of supply was the Paris zoo. This was the pride of Paris, but with meat dwindling a go ahead was given to kill the zoo animals for meat. This is the saddest occasion in the history of France, a nation that pride...
Published by Madan G Singh 63 months ago in European History | +4 votes | 0 comments
The historian Suetonius called him “The Monster.” He has been accused of seducing his sisters, declaring himself a god and making a Roman Legion collect sea shells. Did the Emperor Caligula really do these things? If he did, was he insane? If he was insane, why was an insane man allowed to become Emperor?
Published by Rena Sherwood 67 months ago in European History | +5 votes | 1 comments
The ancient Romans were very religious and they had many gods. Jupiter was the king of gods and he was very important to the Roman people. The Romans built temples all over their empire that were dedicated to different gods. Religion in the Roman Empire was controlled by state officials.
Published by norlaw 69 months ago in European History | +2 votes | 0 comments
John Stuart Mill is regarded as a pioneer feminist. His essay 'the subjection of women' speeded the parliament amendment which gave equal rights to women in many spheres.
Published by Sai Deepa 76 months ago in European History | +6 votes | 7 comments
A concise history of the lead pencil how it evolved from lead to graphite. It's secret use in WW2 and it's links with the Bond movies.
Published by Marion Caragounis 77 months ago in European History | +10 votes | 9 comments
Medieval feudal systems had specific and strict laws that enabled noblemen and the upper class to take advantage of the poor living in a region.
Published by Kathryn Perez 77 months ago in European History | +5 votes | 1 comments
Medieval Europe took advantage of poor conditions and slavery and created a new 'class' of labor. Serfdom was born from Roman Empire slavery and stole the lives of free men in the promise of protection.
Published by Kathryn Perez 77 months ago in European History | +0 votes | 0 comments
A breif, easy summarization of the Hundred Years' War. Explains the background, outcome, and significance of the war.
Published by Forester McClatchey 80 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 0 comments
A break down of the Countries and land areas that comprise the United Kingdom.
Published by Audra Jones 81 months ago in European History | +4 votes | 9 comments
Dachau Concentration Camp was used for more than Jewish internment but was an integral part of WWII History.
Published by Kathryn Perez 81 months ago in European History | +2 votes | 3 comments
The most common type of farm was known as a villa. This traditional farm was located in a rural area and consisted of a house, stables, and workshops with a central courtyard.
Published by sime sparica 82 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 1 comments
Emma Hamilton became the talk of England when she became the mistress of Lord Horatio Nelson, one of England's most famous heroes. Nelson was honoured when he died for king and country at the Battle of Trafalgar, Emma was ignored and died in poverty.
Published by Marion Caragounis 82 months ago in European History | +12 votes | 10 comments
What happened after the Titanic sunk? How is ocean travel safer now because of the sinking of the Titanic
Published by Rae Morvay 82 months ago in European History | +9 votes | 8 comments
The history of the sinking of the Titanic. What happened the night the Titanic sank.
Published by Rae Morvay 82 months ago in European History | +6 votes | 3 comments
The life and times of St. Patrick have much more significance than a day of green garnish and drinking. Here is an overview of the significant events of St. PatrickÂ’s life and legacy.
Published by Danny Hauger 83 months ago in European History | +6 votes | 1 comments
How did England,Scotland,Wales and Ireland decide upon their chosen Patron Saint? Read the story of St. George,St. Andrew, St.David and St. Patrick and you will know.
Published by Marion Caragounis 83 months ago in European History | +3 votes | 4 comments
The White Tower, the original Keep in the Tower of London is a tourist attraction where history has mingled with myth since the Basttle of Hastings in 1066. Seven ravens are kept in the castle as the result of a myth that can be traced as far back as the fifth century.
Published by Marion Caragounis 83 months ago in European History | +2 votes | 2 comments
The Congress of Vienna convened on the 14th of November 1814 and over the next seven months the Five Great Powers of Europe, specifically, England, Austria, Prussia, Russia, and France would meet together in Vienna, often in secret or informal meetings, to decide the course that Europe would take following the conclusion of the Napoleonic wars.
Published by W S 83 months ago in European History | +0 votes | 0 comments
William the Duke of Normandy invaded Anglo-Saxon England in 1066. Read about the events that changed english history in the years following the battle of hastings.
Published by Marion Caragounis 83 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 2 comments
The site of the Battle of Hastings makes a great day out for all the family. Learn about the Normans and the Saxons at the Centre and walk around the battlefield.
Published by Marion Caragounis 84 months ago in European History | +8 votes | 5 comments
This story took place in 1789, when France was still ruled by a king who had a lot of power. We call this system of government absolute monarchy. At that time, the king and his noblemen tried to get extra money by making the working people pay more and more taxes. Most of the working people were poor peasants who got their living from the land. As a matter of fact, they did not own the land, because it was all owned by rich noblemen. The houses in which the working people lived were often dirty,...
Published by Yanto Yulianto 84 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 0 comments
Summer tourists visiting Greece for sea,sun and pleasure would enrich their holiday by stopping off at Athens to see the Partheon. One of the most famous ancient monuments in the world, the temple of Athena on the rocky face of the Acropolis is a sight not to be missed.
Published by Marion Caragounis 85 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 3 comments
In 1930, in a photographic laboratory in Stockholm, Sweden, everyone was excited. They were printing some photos but these were unusual photos. They had been taken 30 years before by a man who had disappeared. Slowly, the pictures became clear. They were the last pictures of Salomon Andree. How had Andree died? The pictures, and an old journal told the story.
Published by Yanto Yulianto 86 months ago in European History | +0 votes | 1 comments
Facts about Catherine Howard, King Henry VIII's fifth wife.
Published by Amanda Jones 87 months ago in European History | +4 votes | 1 comments
Facts about King Henry VIII's fourth wife, Anne of Cleves
Published by Amanda Jones 87 months ago in European History | +2 votes | 0 comments
Facts about King Henry VIII's second wife, Anne Boleyn
Published by Amanda Jones 87 months ago in European History | +7 votes | 6 comments
The crucial facts about Catherine of Aragon, first wife of King Henry VIII of England
Published by Amanda Jones 87 months ago in European History | +5 votes | 2 comments
Growing Up in Ancient Greece. Being a Child in Ancient Greece.
Published by Amanda Wilkins 89 months ago in European History | +1 votes | 0 comments
Manor houses of the Renaissance period belong to a special class of architecture characteristic of the age. A manor house is a fortified country house.
Published by mdlawyer 90 months ago in European History | +7 votes | 2 comments
At first glance, Carcassonne ignites visions of Camelot with conical roofs and medieval soldiers returning from battle. If only the legend matched the history. Carcassonne in Languedoc is situated in the picturesque region of southwest France, standing upon ancient trade routes between the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 91 months ago in European History | +20 votes | 15 comments
Cachtice Castle is situated in the illustrious Carpathian Mountains in Slovakia. Originally it was constructed as a guard post on the thoroughfare to Moravia. Cachtice Castle gained prominence when it became the home of Elizabeth Bathory, otherwise known as the “Blood Countess” or the “Bloody Lady of Cachtice”.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 92 months ago in European History | +15 votes | 14 comments
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